icon-account icon-glass

Join the community!

We'll keep you up to date with interesting news, product information and offers so you never miss out.

No boring newsletters and we'll never share your address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Popular Products

The Lean Protein
Whey protein powder for weight-loss.
The Energy Booster
Pre/intra-workout powder with BCAAs.
The Glow Booster
Collagen supplement for skin.

movement: Movement, Performance, Workouts

Strength Training 101 Webinar
You may have heard that we recently held a Strength Training 101 webinar. Within this webinar, we talked all things strength training, from its benefits to how to get started with weight training. One thing we touched heavily upon were some common strength training myths and why you should stop believing them. If you missed our webinar and would like to catch up, check out the video below. But if you're short of time, read on for a run down of some of the most common strength training misconceptions.  What Is Strength Training? Strength training, also called resistance or weight training, is a type of exercise that aims to make your muscles stronger and improve endurance. It typically involves using weights or resistance to achieve this. The main purpose of strength training is to improve your muscles' ability to produce force. This leads to increased muscle mass, better tone, and improved overall fitness. When you use external resistance like weights or resistance bands, it causes tension in your muscle fibres and microscopic tears. During the recovery phase, your body starts repairing these tears by creating new proteins and muscle fibres, which is what makes your muscles stronger. 4 Common Strength Training Myths: The buzz around strength training doesn’t come without common misconceptions and myths, and I’m sure you have heard many reasons as to why it might hinder your health or just not be of benefit to you.  1. Strength training can make women bulky This myth is  so prevalent within society but seems to be slowly decreasing. Actually, a balanced strength training program with a good diet gives you a lean and toned physique. Numerous studies have shown that genetic and hormonal differences between ourselves and our male counterparts, such as testosterone levels, make gaining large amounts of muscle a greater challenge for women. Studies have also shown that strength training in women tends to lead to an increase in lean body mass, which is associated with improved metabolism and fat loss and contributes to a toned and athletic appearance rather than bulkiness. 2. Cardio is better for fat loss Strength training actually plays a significant role in shedding fat by boosting metabolism and promoting lean muscle mass. A 2019 study by the Institute of Sports Sciences found that muscle is more active than fat -  a pound of muscle can burn anywhere from 10 to 20 calories a day, while a pound of fat burns only 2 to 5 calories a day. A 2020 study published in the Journal of Sports Science also shows that your metabolic rate is increased for up to 72 hours after strength-training exercise. This means that you’re still burning additional calories hours and even days after your workout. Not to mention, combining strength training with cardio creates a more exciting and enjoyable fitness routine than just doing cardio alone. 3. Strength training isn't for older people: It's commonly believed that strength training can injure older people, but research suggests strength training is actually a great activity for older adults. Research shows that after the age of 30, adults can lose 3-5% of muscle mass per decade, so strength training helps to combat this age-related muscle loss. It also helps to maintain bone density, improve joint health, and enhances overall functional fitness. So strength training could actually help prevent age-related injury and promote a higher quality of life as we age.  4. Strength training is time consuming: Lots of people think strength training takes up a lot of time but you can actually achieve effective strength training in short, focused workouts, even 30 to 45 minute workouts can yield significant results. In fact, according to the British Medical Journal, a period of between 30 to 60 minutes of strength training per week is all you need to reap the benefits of strength training. As cliché as it sounds, it's very much quality and consistency over quantity.  In terms of needing a gym, strength training can be a very versatile practice that you can do anywhere, living room, local park, or even the garden. The main key is completing more bodyweight exercises, and adding things like resistance bands. Benefits of Strength Training Now that we've unpacked some truths about strength training, we want to turn our attention to the science behind the holistic benefits that strength training provides. 1.Mental health: Regarding our mental health, current research suggests regular strength training sessions reduce symptoms of both anxiety and depression regardless of age or health status. One way this occurs is through the release of hormones called endorphins which act as a natural mood enhancer and stress reliever, and are part of the reason why when you exercise you feel a little buzz. Our mood can also be improved by the feeling of accomplishment you get when you complete your strength-goals- like upping your squat by a few kg, holding a new yoga pose or just pushing yourself to do a few more reps.On top of this, a systematic review that studied 754 adults showed a significant link between strength training and positive body image, including body satisfaction, appearance, and social anxiety around how you look. 2. Cognitive benefits: A lesser known benefit of strength training is improved cognitive function and neuroprotective effects. Those who engage in strength training may have better brain health and protection against age-related cognitive decline. This is because strength training improves blood flow, reduces inflammation, and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is basically what’s linked to memory and learning. Multiple studies have also pointed to other significant cognitive improvements after participating in strength training, like processing speed, memory, and executive function. Executive function is like the CEO of your brain—it's the boss that helps you plan, organise, manage your emotions and get stuff done. It's what makes sure you remember to grab your keys before leaving the house, helps you follow a recipe, and stick to a schedule without procrastinating or binge-watching TV. 3. Physical strength: It may seem like stating the obvious, but it’s an equally important benefit, and that’s your physical strength. As Shiv talked about earlier, as you progressively challenge your muscles with resistance, they get better at generating force by bringing in more muscle fibres after those microscopic tears. This allows you to lift heavier weights and perform more challenging exercises. This doesn't only mean the benefit is you can squat more or deadlift more, but also translates to completing more mundane tasks more easily like bringing the shopping in or climbing the stairs at work.  Strength training improves posture and reduces lower back pain by enhancing the strength and endurance of core muscles. When the muscles supporting the spine and lower back are strengthened through exercises like squats and deadlifts, they provide better support and stability. This, in turn, helps maintain a more upright posture and reduces the strain on the lower back, which alleviates that pain and improves your spine health. 4. Metabolic and chronic diseases: According to the World Health Organization (WHO), strength training has been associated with a 20-30% reduction in the risk of chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and arthritis.  This is because it’s been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, so your body is able to regulate your blood sugar levels more effectively. It’s been linked to improvements in blood pressure and cholesterol levels. It also improves joint function and overall mobility.  5. Better sleep: Engaging in regular physical activity, including strength training, has been shown in research to improve sleep quality and duration. That research shows that 60% of people who weight train get an average of 7 hours or more of sleep per night. The exertion during workouts, coupled with the positive impact on stress levels, promotes more restful and rejuvenating sleep.   In summary, there are numerous myths surrounding strength training and if you're ever confused about anything you hear about it, you should do some research before disregarding weight training entirely, or simply get in touch on our website for some quick advice. Beyond physical benefits, strength training has many benefits for your overall health, from improving cognitive function to reducing the risk of chronic diseases, strength training enhances overall well-being. Embrace the power of short, focused workouts and discover the joy of achieving strength goals. Strengthen your body, elevate your mood, and foster a healthier, more fulfilling life through the enduring practice of strength training. Read more
Insider Q&A | What Does It Mean to be Strong?
8 Strength Training Myths You Need to Stop Believing
Let's debunk the myths surrounding strength training and pave the way for a more inclusive and informed approach. From dispelling fears of bulking up to challenging the notion that strength supplements offer a shortcut, we unravel the truths that empower individuals to embrace the transformative benefits of building strength. Whether you're a seasoned enthusiast or a newcomer, understanding the reality behind these myths is the key to unlocking the full potential of strength training. It's time to break free from stereotypes, embrace the versatility of strength exercises, and step into a healthier and stronger lifestyle. 8 Strength Training Myths You Need to Stop Believing  1. Bulking Up: One common misconception about strength training is the fear of "bulking up." In reality, a well-rounded strength training program, when combined with a balanced diet, contributes to a lean and toned physique. Women, in particular, don't need to worry about becoming 'bulky' or overly muscular, as hormonal differences make it challenging to achieve a bulky appearance without specific training and nutrition protocols. 2. Strength Supplements Are a Shortcut:While strength supplements can be beneficial, they are not a shortcut to success. Many people believe that these supplements alone can replace a well-rounded diet and consistent training. The truth is, supplements are meant to complement a solid foundation of nutritious food and proper exercise. It's essential to prioritise a healthy lifestyle over relying solely on shortcuts. 3. Cardio Is Superior for Fat Loss:One prevalent myth is that cardiovascular exercise is the only effective way to lose fat, and strength training is only for building muscle. In reality, strength training can play a significant role in fat loss by increasing metabolic rate and promoting the development of lean muscle mass [1]. Combining both strength training and cardiovascular exercise creates a well-rounded fitness routine that maximises fat loss and overall health [2]. 4. Strength Training Is Only for the Young People: Some believe that strength training is exclusively for younger people and that older individuals should avoid it due to the risk of injury. However, strength training is particularly beneficial for older adults. It helps maintain bone density, improves joint health, and enhances overall functional fitness, promoting independence and a higher quality of life as individuals age [3] [4]. 5. You Can Spot-Reduce Fat:Many people believe that performing specific exercises targeting a particular body part will result in localised fat reduction. Unfortunately, spot reduction is a myth. Fat loss occurs systematically across the entire body through a combination of a calorie deficit and regular exercise [5]. While strength training can tone and define specific muscle groups, it does not selectively eliminate fat from those areas.6. Heavy Weights Bulk, Light Weights Tone:Another common misconception is that lifting heavy weights will lead to bulking up, while lifting lighter weights with higher repetitions will result in a toned physique. The reality is that both approaches have their place in a well-rounded strength training program. The key is to adjust the training variables, such as volume and intensity, based on individual goals, rather than relying on a one-size-fits-all approach. 7. Strength Training Is Time-Consuming:Some people shy away from strength training because they believe it requires long, gruelling sessions in the gym. In truth, effective strength training can be achieved in relatively short periods. High-intensity, focused workouts that target key muscle groups can yield significant results in as little as 30 to 45 minutes. Quality and consistency are more important than quantity when it comes to strength training. 8. You Need a Gym to Strength Train: Let's set the record straight. You don't need a gym membership to embark on a powerful strength training journey. Effective strength training is not tethered to fancy equipment or elaborate setups, it's a versatile practice that can unfold anywhere – your living room, a local park, or even the garden. Bodyweight exercises, resistance bands, and creative use of everyday items are your tools to sculpting strength without the need for a gym. To Weigh it Up: By busting these common myths, we pave the way for a more inclusive and informed approach to strength training. Ultimately, it's an accessible practice that benefits individuals of all ages and fitness levels. Embrace the diversity of strength training exercises, tailor your approach to your specific goals, and enjoy the numerous physical and mental rewards that come with building strength. Remember, knowledge is power, and understanding the truth about strength training is the first step toward a healthier and stronger you.     [1] https://pure.bond.edu.au/ws/portalfiles/portal/36134364/AM_The_effect_of_exercise_interventions_on_resting_metabolic_rate.pdf[2] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34957791/[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6279907/[4] https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0269215515610039)[5] https://www.termedia.pl/A-proposed-model-to-test-the-hypothesis-of-exerciseinduced-localized-fat-reduction-spot-reduction-including-a-systematic-review-with-meta-analysis,129,45538,0,1.html Read more
Strength Training 101
Let’s talk strength training, where beyond pumping iron the pursuit of overall wellbeing takes centre stage - or should we say platform. In this article, we'll explore the multifaceted benefits of adding strength training to your weekly routine, and just how you can do so effectively. What is strength training? Strength training, also known as resistance training or weight training, is a form of physical exercise focused on improving muscular strength and endurance through resistance or weights. The primary goal of strength training is to enhance the ability of muscles to generate force, promoting increased muscle mass, improved tone, and overall functional fitness. It works by inducing controlled stress on our muscles to prompt physiological adaptations. When external resistance, such as weights or resistance bands, is applied, it creates tension within the muscle fibres and microscopic tears. During recovery, the body initiates repair processes, forming new proteins and muscle fibres to rebuild these tears and adapt the muscles. This results in increased muscle mass, strength, and endurance over time. What equipment do you need for strength training? Strength training can use a whole host of various equipment, including free weights, resistance bands, or weight machines, and typically involves performing sets and repetitions of specific exercises. Can Anyone Strength train? Strength training is an inclusive and adaptable fitness option suitable for individuals of all ages and backgrounds. Regardless of gender or prior fitness experience, everyone can benefit from incorporating strength exercises into their routines. From beginners focusing on form to advanced lifters pursuing various techniques, strength training accommodates diverse fitness goals. The supportive community environment, both in-person and online, ensures an inclusive space for sharing experiences and motivation. Ultimately, strength training goes beyond building muscles; it fosters strength, confidence, and well-being for everyone.    What are the benefits of strength training?  The Mental Health Boost Strength training is not just about physical gains; it's a holistic approach to health that extends to mental well-being. Engaging in regular weightlifting sessions has been linked to reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression [1]. The release of endorphins during exercise acts as a natural mood enhancer, helping to alleviate stress and improve overall mental clarity [2]. Easier Everyday: It may seem like stating the obvious, but beyond the broader spectrum of benefits, the fundamental advantage of strength training lies in … you guessed it … enhanced physical strength! As you progressively challenge your muscles with resistance, your muscles become more efficient at generating force, allowing you to lift heavier weights and perform more challenging exercises [3].  This improvement in strength not only empowers you within the confines of the gym, but also translates into a newfound capability to tackle everyday tasks with greater ease and confidence. Increased Metabolism: Strength training isn't just about building muscle; it's a metabolic powerhouse. As you engage in resistance exercises, your body works hard to repair and build muscle tissue. This process consumes energy, boosting your resting metabolic rate. Over time, this heightened metabolism becomes an ally in maintaining a healthy weight and supporting fat loss goals [4]. Improved Posture, Joint Health & Bone Density: Strengthening the muscles that support your spine and shoulders helps maintain an upright posture, reducing the risk of chronic back pain [5]. Additionally, targeted exercises can enhance the stability of your joints, contributing to overall joint health and flexibility [6]. Weight-bearing exercises stimulate bone growth and remodelling, making your bones denser and more resistant to fractures [7]. This is particularly significant as you age, helping to combat conditions like osteoporosis and promoting long-term skeletal health. Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity: Regular strength training has been linked to improved insulin sensitivity [8]. This means your body becomes more efficient at utilising insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. This is not only beneficial for individuals with or at risk of diabetes but also contributes to overall metabolic health. Better Sleep Quality: Strength training could also be a natural remedy for those struggling with sleep issues. Engaging in regular physical activity, including strength training, has been shown to improve sleep quality for some [9]. The exertion during workouts, coupled with the positive impact on stress levels, promotes more restful and rejuvenating sleep.  How to Strength Train like a Pro Strength training for beginners: Start with the basics – master proper form and use lighter weights. Focus on fundamental exercises like squats, deadlifts, and bench presses to build a strong foundation. Don’t be afraid to ask your local personal trainer for help (that’s what they are there for!). Equally, if you’re practising at home, recording yourself and watching it back can be a great way to assess your technique - along with getting to grips with your mind to muscle connection, and making sure to feel the burn where you should! Begin by doing 12 reps of each exercise and go through the routine for 3 sets, taking a 30-second break between each set. Aim for a weight that gives you a good challenge, making the last two reps of every set extra tough - you should be too tired to try a 13th repTop of Form! This initial phase will trigger neuromuscular adaptations, enhancing your body's ability to recruit muscle fibres efficiently for strength-based tasks. Level Up:  When you’ve got the hang of it, it’s time to intensify your routine. Gradually increase the weight, reps, or sets, and add variations of different exercises to keep challenging your muscles – this is called progressive overload. Consider split routines, which target specific muscle groups on different days. This will allow for more targeted training and effective recovery. A common split routine divides training sessions into upper and lower body workouts. On upper body days, exercises concentrate on muscles like the chest, back, shoulders, and arms. Lower body sessions then emphasise exercises targeting the legs and glutes. Another approach is the push-pull split, where one day is dedicated to pushing movements (e.g., chest and triceps), and the next focuses on pulling movements (e.g., back and biceps). Advanced Strength Training: Now in the big leagues, strategies such as periodization come into play. Periodization involves cycling through different phases of intensity and volume to prevent plateaus and optimise performance [10].  Advanced lifters may experiment with techniques like drop sets and supersets to induce greater muscle fatigue and stimulate further growth. Recovery becomes paramount at this stage, so listen to your body, prioritise recovery, and make sure to fuel yourself properly for optimal results. Summary In the world of strength training, we've discovered its broad benefits, going beyond muscles to mental well-being, enhanced functionality, metabolism, joint health, and better sleep. Progressing through your strength training journey involves mastering form, intensifying routines, and strategic approaches. Whether you're starting or seasoned, the key is personalisation, consistency, and recovery. Building strength isn't just about weights; it's about a healthier, resilient you. So, grab those weights, start your journey, and watch transformative benefits unfold! [1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137526/[2] https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric-Hall-4/publication/325652029_The_acute_effects_of_resistance_exercise_on_affect_anxiety_and_mood_-_practical_implications_for_designing_resistance_training_programs/links/5b1ee1ab458515270fc46b0c/The-acute-effects-of-resistance-exercise-on-affect-anxiety-and-mood-practical-implications-for-designing-resistance-training-programs.pdf[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892859/[4] https://pure.bond.edu.au/ws/portalfiles/portal/36134364/AM_The_effect_of_exercise_interventions_on_resting_metabolic_rate.pdf[5] https://bmcsportsscimedrehabil.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13102-020-00181-0[6] https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0269215515610039[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6279907/[8] https://www.bewegenismedicijn.nl/files/downloads/tresierras_et_al._2009_-_rt_in_the_treatment_of_diabetes_and_obesity.pdf[9] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4341978/[10] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3438871/#:~:text=Periodization%20is%20the%20planned%20manipulation,the%20onset%20of%20overtraining%20syndrome   Read more
Beginners Guide to the Gym
Beginner Workout Advice Embarking on a new fitness journey can be both exciting and challenging. To get you motivated, we're here to help you understand the science and benefits of joining your local gym or fitness club and to provide you with a basis for a beginner gym workout plan to help you understand how to start working out in the gym. Benefits of getting started in the gym: Regular exercise has many benefits for both the body and mind. On the physical front, getting started at the gym and completing consistent workouts can contribute to enhanced cardiovascular health, promoting a healthy heart and aids blood circulation. Regular exercise is also great for maintaining a healthy weight, managing muscle tone, and strengthening the skeletal system.The cognitive benefits of regular exercise is equally impressive. Scientifically, physical activity of even just 10-30 minutes can stimulate the release of neurotransmitters such as endorphins, which contribute to an improved mood and reduced stress levels. Exercise is also associated with the growth of new neurons in the brain, fostering enhanced cognitive function, sharper memory, and better overall mental power. A basic beginner workout for the gym: Basic Bag Prep: Double check you’ve packed everything you need for your new gym-venture. Think: water, lock, music, towel. Cardio Warm-up (10 minutes): Start with a brisk walk, jog, or cycling to elevate your heart rate and warm up your muscles. As a little hack, this should be at a pace you still feel comfortable to talk at. Follow this up with some basic dynamic stretches, if your stuck on ideas, there’s some great programmes and YouTube content out there. The worlds your oyster! Resistance Training (20-30minutes): Try an incorporate compound exercises like squats, lunges, and bench presses for a full-body workout. Begin with bodyweight exercises if you're new to resistance training and focus on nailing technique. Cardiovascular Exercise (15 minutes): Engage in activities like running, cycling, or rowing to boost your endurance fitness. Choose activities you enjoy to make it more sustainable, and even pair it up with a new gym playlist to help you enjoy getting a sweat on. Cool Down and Stretching (10 minutes): Conclude your first gym session with some additional stretches to improve flexibility and reduce any muscle soreness you may feel the next day. Focus on major muscle groups and hold each stretch for 15-30 seconds.   Things to remember as a beginner working out in the gym: Nervous is normal: Stepping into a gym for the first time can be nerve-wracking. Understand that it's normal to feel a bit anxious, as you're pushing yourself outside your comfort zone. With consistent effort, confidence will naturally grow.Quality over quantity: This is crucial in fitness. Short, focused workouts can be highly effective. Overtraining can lead to burnout and injury, so prioritize consistency and rest for sustainable progress.Motivation fluctuates for everyone: Acknowledge that it's normal to have off-days. Even a lighter workout is better than none. Remember your initial goals and the positive impact exercise has on your well-being.It's Okay to Fail: Failure is an integral part of growth. If a workout doesn't go as planned, view it as an opportunity to learn and improve. Embrace the challenge, for it is through overcoming failures that true progress is made.Gaining a helping hand: Don't hesitate to ask for help from gym staff or fellow gym-goers. Asking for help is a smart way to learn the correct techniques, making your workouts more effective and reducing the risk of injury. Risk, Reduction, Repeat… Making sure we are keeping ourselves safe in the gym is king, especially when getting the most out of our new regime. Begin each session with a dynamic warm-up to increase blood flow, preparing muscles for activity and reducing injury risk. Prioritise technique over weight, ensuring proper form to prevent strain and reduce the risk of injury. Incrementally increase exercise intensity and duration to avoid overexertion and reduce the risk of injury. Follow a structured program that gradually challenges your fitness level, preventing overtraining, and ask your local personal trainer for what this might potentially look like if you’re unsure. Allow adequate time for rest and recovery to prevent overtraining, reducing the risk of injury. Listen to your body, pay attention to early warning signs, and schedule rest days between intense workouts. Remember, consistency is key. Begin with manageable intensity and gradually progress to more challenging workouts. Always consult a fitness professional or healthcare provider before starting a new exercise program, especially if you have pre-existing health conditions. Enjoy the journey to a healthier, stronger, and sharper you! Read more
Top 3 Benefits of Interval Training
Do you ever feel like your fitness routine is stuck in a rut, or that you're not getting the results you desire? If so, it might be time to shake things up and give interval training a go. This science-backed workout strategy has taken the fitness world by storm in recent years, and for good reason too. Interval training (IT), offers a dynamic and effective way to transform your fitness level, but how do we get the most of this approach and how’s best to use IT to get fit? Understanding the Science of Interval Training: Interval training is all about alternating between short bursts of intense exercise with brief periods of active recovery or rest. This cycle is repeated, and is what makes this training a powerful way to improve physical fitness, physiological functions and cardiovascular disease risk. High-intensity interval training (HIIT), whereby efforts elicit ≥90% of maximal oxygen uptake or >75% of maximal power. Sprint interval training (SIT), a more intense version of HIIT with efforts above VO2 max or maximal power. Repeated-sprint training (RST), characterised by performing a high number of sprints with a shorter recovery interval. The Top 3 Benefits of Interval Training: 1. Fat Burn Furnace: Current research is in favour of the elevated burning of calories in HIIT based exercise to that of its steady-state counterparts, especially if it combines both weight based and aerobic activities. This is thought to stem from the effect of HIIT on our metabolic rate, and it’s pretty neat ability to shift our body’s metabolism to burn fat as opposed to carbs even after we’ve completed the workout. Meaning along with a healthy-balanced diet, the inclusion of this super strategy couldbe the perfect accomplice for weight loss. 2. Cardiovascular Supercharge: Interval training is not just about torching calories; it's also a bonus for your heart health. Those intense intervals help improve your cardiovascular fitness by bettering your heart rate and strengthening your heart's ability to pump blood effectively. This translates to improved cardiovascular function and decreased risk of disease. 3. Time-Efficient Workouts: In today's fast-paced world, time is precious. The beauty of interval training is that it offers these great results in a short amount of time. A typical session can range from just 20 to 30 minutes, making it a highly efficient choice for busy individuals. With it being so short and snappy you are also more likely to get a sense of enjoyment out of this training type, with its constantly changing stimuli and short length. Getting Started with Interval Training: So, how can you harness the power of interval training for your fitness journey? Here's your action plan: 1. Warm Up: Always begin with a thorough warm-up to prepare your muscles and joints for theintensity ahead. A warm-up session of 5-10 minutes can include light jogging, dynamic stretching, or mobility exercises. 2. Choose Your Intervals: Determine the duration and intensity of your high-intensity intervals.These should push you to around 80-90% of your maximum effort. The recovery periods should be less intense, allowing you to catch your breath. 3. Variety is Key: Keep things interesting by mixing up your exercises. Whether it's sprinting, cycling, or bodyweight exercises, the key is to engage different muscle groups to prevent monotony and keep your body challenged. 4. Safety First: Pay attention and listen to your body. While pushing your limits is essential, safetyalways comes first. Ensure proper form and alignment to reduce the risk of injury. 5. Cool Down: Wrap up your session with a cool-down period to gradually lower your heart rate and prevent dizziness or fainting. Stretching and controlled breathing are excellent ways to achieve this. Adding an interval-based training to your weekly workout can revitalise your fitness routine and improve overall wellbeing. The science-backed benefits and the time-efficiency of interval training makes it an ideal choice for today's busy lifestyles. So, gear up, embrace the intensity, and let interval training unlock your fitness potential. Your body will thank you, and you'll be well on your way to achieving your fitness goals.   Read more
Woman kickboxing with coach
The Best Exercises To Improve Your Rowing PB
Whether a seasoned gym addict, first-time fitness enthusiast, or avid water goer, there’s nothing quite like smashing your rowing PB. While it might look intimidating to begin, it’s much simpler, addictive, and most importantly, beneficial to your body than beginners might think. Like any workout PB however, there can reach a point where your best time seems to plateau. After all, there are only so many times you can improve right? Well not necessarily. In addition to a high protein diet and the use of fitness supplements like The Power Booster to aid performance, there are a wide range of exercises to try that can improve rowing endurance, power, and technique. By the end, getting a faster rowing PB should be a breeze. The Benefits Of Rowing Firstly, it’s important to ask; should you go for a PB in the first place? Short answer: absolutely! Rowing offers a complete high-intensity exercise all without skipping a beat; just a single session will train 9 of your muscle groups and around 85% of your body’s muscles. Compared to other workouts, this builds strength and endurance within key muscles in the upper and lower body. While achieving that rowing PB can be tough, being able to endure the challenge and feel the muscle growth is an unmatched workout joy. The versatility of rowing means everyone from cardio lovers to arm day enthusiasts can look forward to smashing their next PB. Rowing workouts are also low-impact and kind to your individual joints. This makes it the perfect PB challenge for those recovering from, and looking to avoid persistent injury - or perhaps even the dreaded shin splints. The exercise also provides mental benefits for the individual through the release of endorphins (the body’s feel-good hormones).   Exercises To Improve Your PB So how do you go about improving your PB? Well because rowing utilizes a complete range of muscles, getting a better time is all about targeting these individual parts of the body. This requires a mix of all types of workouts from cardio and core to strength training. Cardio Workouts To bring rowing performance to the next level, it’s almost essential to incorporate a strong aerobic focus into your exercise. Given the repetitive and continuous motions required with rowing, it’s easy to get stuck in the trap of pushing yourself too much – especially when it comes to striving for a PB. Cardio performance exercises are a fantastic method to build your rowing endurance, improve your heart health, and simply just lift your mood. For the best results, we’d recommend a mix of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and steady-state cardio (SSC) workouts. High-Intensity Interval Training HIIT exercises are all about raising the heart rate and building strength and stamina. They balance short but maximum-intensity workouts with rest intervals – think short sprints, fast cycling, and squat jumps. This makes HIIT an important tool to improve cardio capabilities and smash that rowing PB goal. Steady State Cardio SSC workouts on the other hand focus on continuous but long-term workouts. Instead of 2-minute short sprints of high intensity, you might take a light 30-minute jog for a consistent heart rate. These exercises have the benefit of improving your endurance levels and making it easier to continue rowing until hitting your distance target.     Strength Training While debates continue to rage about whether rowing is a cardio exercise – we’re firmly of the it is camp – strength plays just as vital a role as endurance. Regardless of whether you row 500, 1000, 2000 metres, or beyond, there will always be a mental balance required between the rowing strength you exert per rep and the overall distance remaining. By improving key muscles through strength training, you can reduce the effort and difficulty on each row to improve speed and overall performance. Given the full body sequence of actions used in rowing, we’d recommend you focus your workout on 3 key areas: legs, core, and arms.         Leg Exercises Your leg contains some of the strongest muscles in the body. Given its importance to strong rowing performance, it’s not exactly surprising that we’re recommending you incorporate leg exercises into your fitness routine. This is especially true at the rowing catch point - the end point of each row – where the greatest leg force is required. To improve leg muscle strength, we recommend simple but effective exercises like squats, lunges, and targeted deadlift sessions.     Core Exercises While it might not be completely obvious, your core muscles – the stomach and lower back muscles - play a pivotal part in maintaining your posture and improving your rowing PB. They are especially important in supporting rowing form toward the end of the workout when you begin to tire. A strong core also minimises the workload on other muscles that would otherwise have to work harder to compensate for a weak core. Core workouts are also simple to do whether at home or the gym. Just some ideas include plants, hip bridges, and Pilate ab crunches. Arm Exercises Arm strength also plays a significant role in maintaining rowing form, albeit slightly different depending on whether you’re at the gym or treading the waters. For water goers, the arms act as a messenger of sorts. They transfer the power generated from the leg and core muscles into the rowing oar and push the boat forward – a fairly important element to achieving any sort of distance. For the motivated gym goer, strong arms can provide well-defined concentric and eccentric muscle movements that benefit form. To focus on improving arm muscle strength, there are plenty of exercises you to try. Just some effective choices are bicep curl and triceps extension workouts, but you can even try something as simple as home push-ups (which will also help in improving core strength). The Importance Of Technique, Rest, And Recovery With all this said, a key and often overlooked part of improving a rowing PB is simply getting the basics - effective form and technique before, during, and after any exercise – down. Consider adding some simple and easy stretches before a session to effectively warm up your muscles and best prepare your body. Likewise, you could have all the endurance tools you need to succeed, but a poor rowing technique could see you waste unnecessary energy. Efficiency is key here. The other added benefit of good form is that it greatly reduces the chance of any injuries which let’s face it, is quite important to training and smashing the next PB. As someone who has gone for a personal best on many occasions, I can agree that this last part can be the most difficult, but achieving a PB is all about planning rest and recovery days into your training. Listening to your body here can be crucial. Pushing too hard increases the risk of overtraining, potentially leading to injury. To this end, it can make it easier to think of recovery as another stage of the workout process. Remember, rest days don’t necessarily mean you have to do nothing all day. Gentle exercises like walks and even yoga can work wonders for body recovery. Interested to discover more about Innermost Power Booster Supplements? Looking for the best ways to fuel your next workout? Perhaps you have some amazing and inspired ideas to share? Don’t hesitate to message us on our Instagram @liveinnermost. Read more
What Is CrossFit And How Do I Get Started?
There’s a plenty of discussion around CrossFit exercise at the moment and for good reason. What once started as a simple workout concept has now grown to engage entire open workout communities; all with one goal – building a supportive and multidisciplinary workout. With more than 15,000 affiliate CrossFit gyms across the world and over 500 in the UK, you’d probably assume everyone knows what the workout involves and how you can get started right?    Well… Despite its popularity CrossFit still remains one of the most misunderstood workouts around. Asking someone to explain its meaning will 9 times out of 10 give you a long ‘uhh’ followed by words like “tough”, “intense” and “athletic”. It’s this preconceived notion that it’s only for those at the peak of their fitness that can make the prospect of starting so intimidating. What if I instead told you that CrossFit offers the optimal full-body workout for everyone – especially those looking to begin their fitness journey? We at Innermost have prepared this all-in-one guide to clear up a few misconceptions about the workout and make the prospect of getting started a breeze.    What Is CrossFit? It’s important to understand exactly what CrossFit actually is, what it involves, and how it can benefit your workout routine. Unlike strength training and cardio exercises that target specific muscles in the body, CrossFit aims to build entire body muscle mass through sequential high-intensity workouts. Established in 2000 by Greg and Lauren Glassman, what also makes CrossFit so unique is that individual routines are entirely flexible and as such no two workouts are the same. While training will be tough, you and your trainer can create perfectly scaled CrossFit workouts to improve your relative fitness. These alterations could be based on the duration, type, speed, load, and frequency of your training. You will thrive in a genuinely varied but personalised training program that is crafted to improve your functional strength and conditioning. It’s also important to remember that CrossFit improvement is based just as much on diet and nutrition as the training itself.  By pairing your workout with supplements like Innermost’s The Fit Protein you will be able to push your workouts comfortably further than most. Benefits Of CrossFit Whether you’re looking to lose weight, keep fit, or build muscle, it’s no surprise to say that CrossFit workouts have plenty of benefits. This is because the variety of functional high-intensity exercises within each session allows for positive physical effects all across the body. CrossFit functional workouts benefit these 10 core fitness areas: Cardiovascular endurance – Your ability to gather oxygen. Stamina – The processing, storing, and utilising of body energy. Strength – Your muscle’s ability to apply force. Flexibility – Maximises the motion of your joints. Power – The speed to which you can apply maximum muscle power in the quickest time. Speed – The efficiency of repeated movements. Coordination – Merging multiple movements into a single motion. Agility – Minimises the transition time between your movements. Balance – Control over your body’s centre of gravity. Accuracy – Your control over movements. While this might sound like a lot, trust me, getting into it is not as complicated as it sounds. Most of these core tenants are built into multiple individual exercises, providing a diverse range of benefits for your body. With a strong sense of community within each gym, taking part in CrossFit can also greatly improve your mood and even mental health.   How To Get Started Now you know why you should give CrossFit a go, you might be anxious about how exactly to start your workout routine. Remember, everyone has to start somewhere, so don’t go pushing too hard at the start before you can walk. With that in mind, here are a few key pointers to get started. Preparation First of all, get some appropriate training gear. Those who try CrossFit training in standard Vans will quickly realise the need for versatile and durable footwear. Your cross shoes should be fully supportive of multiple movement patterns and applied forces. You also want to look for workout tops and bottoms that are fully adept at soaking up a sweat – the last thing you want is to be itching the whole time. Finding The Right Gym The next step is to find the perfect personal trainer and CrossFit gym. This is something unique to everyone. Will you be motivated more by a gym with a supportive or competitive culture? When do you want to attend and what is the standard of coaching like? Most CrossFit facilities provide a trial period which we recommend you use first to get a feel of whether the gym works for you. Tailor Your Workout Before the first workout, it’s a good idea to work out what you want to achieve. As previously mentioned, exercises are completely scalable meaning they can be tailored to you. Are you looking to build strength, endurance, or speed? Do you want to focus on concentric or eccentric exercises? Even if you’re recovering from injury, CrossFit can be altered to speed up rehabilitation rather than force you to push through the pain. Track Your Progress Getting started with CrossFit is all about having a journey-based mindset to develop ability and fitness. No one is reaching the stars on session 1, but by tracking your training ‘firsts’ and personal bests you’ll have added excitement and motivation to keep going from the get-go. Tracking your progress from the start has also been scientifically proven to drive improvement in performance and goal attainment. We’d also recommend monitoring you’re nutrition and protein intake and looking at how it improves your workout. Consider adding one of Innermost’s many supplements such as our Fit Protein Powder to your daily routine. CrossFit Exercises For Beginners For individuals just being introduced to the world of CrossFit, knowing which exercises and training plans to go with can feel intimidating. To make things easier for you, here are just a few workouts to try that are perfect for those at the start of their training. Every Minute On The Minute (EMOM)  EMOM workouts are fairly self-explanatory but perfect for your development plans. These workouts see individuals deviate between start and rest exercise intervals while completing as many reps as possible. By measuring performance across a defined time period, progress and recovery can be closely monitored.   As Many Rounds As Possible (AMRAP) While AMRAP exercises can be tough they make for the perfect introductory CrossFit workout. Essentially, it’s all about quick-time high-intensity aerobic exercise. The focus is pushing yourself to complete as many exercise reps as possible within a given time and monitoring your progress. Ladder  Ladder workouts are also a good choice for CrossFit beginners, as they provide the best of both training plans. Instead of high-intensity or interval workouts, muscle workload is increased or decreased over a given amount of time. This change in muscle demand offers great benefits to speed and agility.     Interested to learn more about Innermost The Fit Protein? Looking for the ultimate gym bag essentials? Maybe you want to share your own experiences of getting into CrossFit? Message us on our Instagram @liveinnermost. Read more
The Exercise Ball Workouts You Didn't Know You Needed
Beginner lifting heavy weights
We've Created The Perfect Full Body Summer Workout
Man hiking over bridge outdoors