icon-account icon-glass

Join the community!

We'll keep you up to date with interesting news, product information and offers so you never miss out.

No boring newsletters and we'll never share your address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Popular Products

The Lean Protein
Whey protein powder for weight-loss.
The Energy Booster
Pre/intra-workout powder with BCAAs.
The Glow Booster
Collagen supplement for skin.

Movement

Strength Training 101 Webinar
You may have heard that we recently held a Strength Training 101 webinar. Within this webinar, we talked all things strength training, from its benefits to how to get started with weight training. One thing we touched heavily upon were some common strength training myths and why you should stop believing them. If you missed our webinar and would like to catch up, check out the video below. But if you're short of time, read on for a run down of some of the most common strength training misconceptions.  What Is Strength Training? Strength training, also called resistance or weight training, is a type of exercise that aims to make your muscles stronger and improve endurance. It typically involves using weights or resistance to achieve this. The main purpose of strength training is to improve your muscles' ability to produce force. This leads to increased muscle mass, better tone, and improved overall fitness. When you use external resistance like weights or resistance bands, it causes tension in your muscle fibres and microscopic tears. During the recovery phase, your body starts repairing these tears by creating new proteins and muscle fibres, which is what makes your muscles stronger. 4 Common Strength Training Myths: The buzz around strength training doesn’t come without common misconceptions and myths, and I’m sure you have heard many reasons as to why it might hinder your health or just not be of benefit to you.  1. Strength training can make women bulky This myth is  so prevalent within society but seems to be slowly decreasing. Actually, a balanced strength training program with a good diet gives you a lean and toned physique. Numerous studies have shown that genetic and hormonal differences between ourselves and our male counterparts, such as testosterone levels, make gaining large amounts of muscle a greater challenge for women. Studies have also shown that strength training in women tends to lead to an increase in lean body mass, which is associated with improved metabolism and fat loss and contributes to a toned and athletic appearance rather than bulkiness. 2. Cardio is better for fat loss Strength training actually plays a significant role in shedding fat by boosting metabolism and promoting lean muscle mass. A 2019 study by the Institute of Sports Sciences found that muscle is more active than fat -  a pound of muscle can burn anywhere from 10 to 20 calories a day, while a pound of fat burns only 2 to 5 calories a day. A 2020 study published in the Journal of Sports Science also shows that your metabolic rate is increased for up to 72 hours after strength-training exercise. This means that you’re still burning additional calories hours and even days after your workout. Not to mention, combining strength training with cardio creates a more exciting and enjoyable fitness routine than just doing cardio alone. 3. Strength training isn't for older people: It's commonly believed that strength training can injure older people, but research suggests strength training is actually a great activity for older adults. Research shows that after the age of 30, adults can lose 3-5% of muscle mass per decade, so strength training helps to combat this age-related muscle loss. It also helps to maintain bone density, improve joint health, and enhances overall functional fitness. So strength training could actually help prevent age-related injury and promote a higher quality of life as we age.  4. Strength training is time consuming: Lots of people think strength training takes up a lot of time but you can actually achieve effective strength training in short, focused workouts, even 30 to 45 minute workouts can yield significant results. In fact, according to the British Medical Journal, a period of between 30 to 60 minutes of strength training per week is all you need to reap the benefits of strength training. As cliché as it sounds, it's very much quality and consistency over quantity.  In terms of needing a gym, strength training can be a very versatile practice that you can do anywhere, living room, local park, or even the garden. The main key is completing more bodyweight exercises, and adding things like resistance bands. Benefits of Strength Training Now that we've unpacked some truths about strength training, we want to turn our attention to the science behind the holistic benefits that strength training provides. 1.Mental health: Regarding our mental health, current research suggests regular strength training sessions reduce symptoms of both anxiety and depression regardless of age or health status. One way this occurs is through the release of hormones called endorphins which act as a natural mood enhancer and stress reliever, and are part of the reason why when you exercise you feel a little buzz. Our mood can also be improved by the feeling of accomplishment you get when you complete your strength-goals- like upping your squat by a few kg, holding a new yoga pose or just pushing yourself to do a few more reps.On top of this, a systematic review that studied 754 adults showed a significant link between strength training and positive body image, including body satisfaction, appearance, and social anxiety around how you look. 2. Cognitive benefits: A lesser known benefit of strength training is improved cognitive function and neuroprotective effects. Those who engage in strength training may have better brain health and protection against age-related cognitive decline. This is because strength training improves blood flow, reduces inflammation, and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is basically what’s linked to memory and learning. Multiple studies have also pointed to other significant cognitive improvements after participating in strength training, like processing speed, memory, and executive function. Executive function is like the CEO of your brain—it's the boss that helps you plan, organise, manage your emotions and get stuff done. It's what makes sure you remember to grab your keys before leaving the house, helps you follow a recipe, and stick to a schedule without procrastinating or binge-watching TV. 3. Physical strength: It may seem like stating the obvious, but it’s an equally important benefit, and that’s your physical strength. As Shiv talked about earlier, as you progressively challenge your muscles with resistance, they get better at generating force by bringing in more muscle fibres after those microscopic tears. This allows you to lift heavier weights and perform more challenging exercises. This doesn't only mean the benefit is you can squat more or deadlift more, but also translates to completing more mundane tasks more easily like bringing the shopping in or climbing the stairs at work.  Strength training improves posture and reduces lower back pain by enhancing the strength and endurance of core muscles. When the muscles supporting the spine and lower back are strengthened through exercises like squats and deadlifts, they provide better support and stability. This, in turn, helps maintain a more upright posture and reduces the strain on the lower back, which alleviates that pain and improves your spine health. 4. Metabolic and chronic diseases: According to the World Health Organization (WHO), strength training has been associated with a 20-30% reduction in the risk of chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and arthritis.  This is because it’s been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, so your body is able to regulate your blood sugar levels more effectively. It’s been linked to improvements in blood pressure and cholesterol levels. It also improves joint function and overall mobility.  5. Better sleep: Engaging in regular physical activity, including strength training, has been shown in research to improve sleep quality and duration. That research shows that 60% of people who weight train get an average of 7 hours or more of sleep per night. The exertion during workouts, coupled with the positive impact on stress levels, promotes more restful and rejuvenating sleep.   In summary, there are numerous myths surrounding strength training and if you're ever confused about anything you hear about it, you should do some research before disregarding weight training entirely, or simply get in touch on our website for some quick advice. Beyond physical benefits, strength training has many benefits for your overall health, from improving cognitive function to reducing the risk of chronic diseases, strength training enhances overall well-being. Embrace the power of short, focused workouts and discover the joy of achieving strength goals. Strengthen your body, elevate your mood, and foster a healthier, more fulfilling life through the enduring practice of strength training. Read more
Insider Q&A | What Does It Mean to be Strong?
Strength Training 101
Let’s talk strength training, where beyond pumping iron the pursuit of overall wellbeing takes centre stage - or should we say platform. In this article, we'll explore the multifaceted benefits of adding strength training to your weekly routine, and just how you can do so effectively. What is strength training? Strength training, also known as resistance training or weight training, is a form of physical exercise focused on improving muscular strength and endurance through resistance or weights. The primary goal of strength training is to enhance the ability of muscles to generate force, promoting increased muscle mass, improved tone, and overall functional fitness. It works by inducing controlled stress on our muscles to prompt physiological adaptations. When external resistance, such as weights or resistance bands, is applied, it creates tension within the muscle fibres and microscopic tears. During recovery, the body initiates repair processes, forming new proteins and muscle fibres to rebuild these tears and adapt the muscles. This results in increased muscle mass, strength, and endurance over time. What equipment do you need for strength training? Strength training can use a whole host of various equipment, including free weights, resistance bands, or weight machines, and typically involves performing sets and repetitions of specific exercises. Can Anyone Strength train? Strength training is an inclusive and adaptable fitness option suitable for individuals of all ages and backgrounds. Regardless of gender or prior fitness experience, everyone can benefit from incorporating strength exercises into their routines. From beginners focusing on form to advanced lifters pursuing various techniques, strength training accommodates diverse fitness goals. The supportive community environment, both in-person and online, ensures an inclusive space for sharing experiences and motivation. Ultimately, strength training goes beyond building muscles; it fosters strength, confidence, and well-being for everyone.    What are the benefits of strength training?  The Mental Health Boost Strength training is not just about physical gains; it's a holistic approach to health that extends to mental well-being. Engaging in regular weightlifting sessions has been linked to reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression [1]. The release of endorphins during exercise acts as a natural mood enhancer, helping to alleviate stress and improve overall mental clarity [2]. Easier Everyday: It may seem like stating the obvious, but beyond the broader spectrum of benefits, the fundamental advantage of strength training lies in … you guessed it … enhanced physical strength! As you progressively challenge your muscles with resistance, your muscles become more efficient at generating force, allowing you to lift heavier weights and perform more challenging exercises [3].  This improvement in strength not only empowers you within the confines of the gym, but also translates into a newfound capability to tackle everyday tasks with greater ease and confidence. Increased Metabolism: Strength training isn't just about building muscle; it's a metabolic powerhouse. As you engage in resistance exercises, your body works hard to repair and build muscle tissue. This process consumes energy, boosting your resting metabolic rate. Over time, this heightened metabolism becomes an ally in maintaining a healthy weight and supporting fat loss goals [4]. Improved Posture, Joint Health & Bone Density: Strengthening the muscles that support your spine and shoulders helps maintain an upright posture, reducing the risk of chronic back pain [5]. Additionally, targeted exercises can enhance the stability of your joints, contributing to overall joint health and flexibility [6]. Weight-bearing exercises stimulate bone growth and remodelling, making your bones denser and more resistant to fractures [7]. This is particularly significant as you age, helping to combat conditions like osteoporosis and promoting long-term skeletal health. Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity: Regular strength training has been linked to improved insulin sensitivity [8]. This means your body becomes more efficient at utilising insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. This is not only beneficial for individuals with or at risk of diabetes but also contributes to overall metabolic health. Better Sleep Quality: Strength training could also be a natural remedy for those struggling with sleep issues. Engaging in regular physical activity, including strength training, has been shown to improve sleep quality for some [9]. The exertion during workouts, coupled with the positive impact on stress levels, promotes more restful and rejuvenating sleep.  How to Strength Train like a Pro Strength training for beginners: Start with the basics – master proper form and use lighter weights. Focus on fundamental exercises like squats, deadlifts, and bench presses to build a strong foundation. Don’t be afraid to ask your local personal trainer for help (that’s what they are there for!). Equally, if you’re practising at home, recording yourself and watching it back can be a great way to assess your technique - along with getting to grips with your mind to muscle connection, and making sure to feel the burn where you should! Begin by doing 12 reps of each exercise and go through the routine for 3 sets, taking a 30-second break between each set. Aim for a weight that gives you a good challenge, making the last two reps of every set extra tough - you should be too tired to try a 13th repTop of Form! This initial phase will trigger neuromuscular adaptations, enhancing your body's ability to recruit muscle fibres efficiently for strength-based tasks. Level Up:  When you’ve got the hang of it, it’s time to intensify your routine. Gradually increase the weight, reps, or sets, and add variations of different exercises to keep challenging your muscles – this is called progressive overload. Consider split routines, which target specific muscle groups on different days. This will allow for more targeted training and effective recovery. A common split routine divides training sessions into upper and lower body workouts. On upper body days, exercises concentrate on muscles like the chest, back, shoulders, and arms. Lower body sessions then emphasise exercises targeting the legs and glutes. Another approach is the push-pull split, where one day is dedicated to pushing movements (e.g., chest and triceps), and the next focuses on pulling movements (e.g., back and biceps). Advanced Strength Training: Now in the big leagues, strategies such as periodization come into play. Periodization involves cycling through different phases of intensity and volume to prevent plateaus and optimise performance [10].  Advanced lifters may experiment with techniques like drop sets and supersets to induce greater muscle fatigue and stimulate further growth. Recovery becomes paramount at this stage, so listen to your body, prioritise recovery, and make sure to fuel yourself properly for optimal results. Summary In the world of strength training, we've discovered its broad benefits, going beyond muscles to mental well-being, enhanced functionality, metabolism, joint health, and better sleep. Progressing through your strength training journey involves mastering form, intensifying routines, and strategic approaches. Whether you're starting or seasoned, the key is personalisation, consistency, and recovery. Building strength isn't just about weights; it's about a healthier, resilient you. So, grab those weights, start your journey, and watch transformative benefits unfold! [1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137526/[2] https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric-Hall-4/publication/325652029_The_acute_effects_of_resistance_exercise_on_affect_anxiety_and_mood_-_practical_implications_for_designing_resistance_training_programs/links/5b1ee1ab458515270fc46b0c/The-acute-effects-of-resistance-exercise-on-affect-anxiety-and-mood-practical-implications-for-designing-resistance-training-programs.pdf[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892859/[4] https://pure.bond.edu.au/ws/portalfiles/portal/36134364/AM_The_effect_of_exercise_interventions_on_resting_metabolic_rate.pdf[5] https://bmcsportsscimedrehabil.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13102-020-00181-0[6] https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0269215515610039[7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6279907/[8] https://www.bewegenismedicijn.nl/files/downloads/tresierras_et_al._2009_-_rt_in_the_treatment_of_diabetes_and_obesity.pdf[9] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4341978/[10] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3438871/#:~:text=Periodization%20is%20the%20planned%20manipulation,the%20onset%20of%20overtraining%20syndrome   Read more
Top 3 Benefits of Interval Training
Do you ever feel like your fitness routine is stuck in a rut, or that you're not getting the results you desire? If so, it might be time to shake things up and give interval training a go. This science-backed workout strategy has taken the fitness world by storm in recent years, and for good reason too. Interval training (IT), offers a dynamic and effective way to transform your fitness level, but how do we get the most of this approach and how’s best to use IT to get fit? Understanding the Science of Interval Training: Interval training is all about alternating between short bursts of intense exercise with brief periods of active recovery or rest. This cycle is repeated, and is what makes this training a powerful way to improve physical fitness, physiological functions and cardiovascular disease risk. High-intensity interval training (HIIT), whereby efforts elicit ≥90% of maximal oxygen uptake or >75% of maximal power. Sprint interval training (SIT), a more intense version of HIIT with efforts above VO2 max or maximal power. Repeated-sprint training (RST), characterised by performing a high number of sprints with a shorter recovery interval. The Top 3 Benefits of Interval Training: 1. Fat Burn Furnace: Current research is in favour of the elevated burning of calories in HIIT based exercise to that of its steady-state counterparts, especially if it combines both weight based and aerobic activities. This is thought to stem from the effect of HIIT on our metabolic rate, and it’s pretty neat ability to shift our body’s metabolism to burn fat as opposed to carbs even after we’ve completed the workout. Meaning along with a healthy-balanced diet, the inclusion of this super strategy couldbe the perfect accomplice for weight loss. 2. Cardiovascular Supercharge: Interval training is not just about torching calories; it's also a bonus for your heart health. Those intense intervals help improve your cardiovascular fitness by bettering your heart rate and strengthening your heart's ability to pump blood effectively. This translates to improved cardiovascular function and decreased risk of disease. 3. Time-Efficient Workouts: In today's fast-paced world, time is precious. The beauty of interval training is that it offers these great results in a short amount of time. A typical session can range from just 20 to 30 minutes, making it a highly efficient choice for busy individuals. With it being so short and snappy you are also more likely to get a sense of enjoyment out of this training type, with its constantly changing stimuli and short length. Getting Started with Interval Training: So, how can you harness the power of interval training for your fitness journey? Here's your action plan: 1. Warm Up: Always begin with a thorough warm-up to prepare your muscles and joints for theintensity ahead. A warm-up session of 5-10 minutes can include light jogging, dynamic stretching, or mobility exercises. 2. Choose Your Intervals: Determine the duration and intensity of your high-intensity intervals.These should push you to around 80-90% of your maximum effort. The recovery periods should be less intense, allowing you to catch your breath. 3. Variety is Key: Keep things interesting by mixing up your exercises. Whether it's sprinting, cycling, or bodyweight exercises, the key is to engage different muscle groups to prevent monotony and keep your body challenged. 4. Safety First: Pay attention and listen to your body. While pushing your limits is essential, safetyalways comes first. Ensure proper form and alignment to reduce the risk of injury. 5. Cool Down: Wrap up your session with a cool-down period to gradually lower your heart rate and prevent dizziness or fainting. Stretching and controlled breathing are excellent ways to achieve this. Adding an interval-based training to your weekly workout can revitalise your fitness routine and improve overall wellbeing. The science-backed benefits and the time-efficiency of interval training makes it an ideal choice for today's busy lifestyles. So, gear up, embrace the intensity, and let interval training unlock your fitness potential. Your body will thank you, and you'll be well on your way to achieving your fitness goals.   Read more
Woman kickboxing with coach
Man hiking over bridge outdoors
How To Feel Energised First Thing In The Morning
Cut outs of woman Innermost tone capsules and apple for summer
Research Into Hormetic Stress Shows How You Can Improve Your Exercise Routine
Woman stretching
Woman meditating
Inflammation And Muscle Growth: A Primer
What Are Hip Dips? And Why They Don’t Need To Be Fixed
Ever looked in the mirror and suddenly noticed something about your body that had never occurred to you before? Us too.  Hip dips, sometimes known as violin hips, are the gentle inward curves found just below your hips and above your thighs - and it’s the latest body part to be the target of online obsession. Google searches asking what hip dips are and how to get rid of them have soared in recent months, so if you’ve found yourself searching ‘how to get rid of hip dips’ after midnight, you’re definitely not alone.  You may have read that hip dips are a cause for worry, can be changed through exercise or are bad. This is absolutely untrue. We’re here to give you the lowdown.  What are hip dips? Hip dips, or violin hips, are nothing more than a naturally occurring indentation that may exist between your thighs and your hips. Some people’s hips have them and some don’t - and it’s an inherent part of your skeleton and biology.  Whether or not you’re blessed with hip dips depends on the shape of your hip bones. Some people’s body shape means that they have more visible hip dips than others. They’re a completely normal part of your body structure caused by the naturally inward-facing curves formed by the shape of your pelvis. They’re not created by being unhealthy, overweight or underweight - although having a higher level of body fat or muscle mass can make them more pronounced. How to get rid of hip dip The presence of hip dips is down to the shape of your bones, and they can’t be exercised or dieted away. While some people may find that they become smaller when they reduce body fat and increase muscle mass, there’s no guarantee that this will happen. Plus, if you focus too much on or avoid exercises that work your hip flexors and quads in favour of working on your glutes so as to avoid targeting the dips, you risk injuries from overworking certain body parts and neglecting others.  More important is the mental impact of worrying about such things. Negative self-talk about body image and dissatisfaction with the way you look can affect your mental health and your self-image. The rhetoric that naturally occurring body parts look bad or should be exercised away is exceptionally negative - it’s like calling the fact that you have two arms a ‘problem area’.  Hip dip exercises A quick social media search reveals that thousands of people online are obsessed with the shape of their hips. Before and after photos, which are almost certainly airbrushed, abound, and there are plenty of videos and tutorials promising to get rid of hip dips for good. There’s even the extreme option of hip dip surgery.  This narrative of supposed self-improvement and obsessively focusing on an impossible-to-change body part could lead to body dysmorphia or eating disorders. This could present as exercising obsessively, restricting food intake, binging and purging and being generally chronically unhappy with the way that you look. Focus on loving your body, staying healthy and strong and putting your energy into what you can change, rather than feeling negative about what you can’t.  It’s a good idea to focus on strengthening your lower body as an entire entity, which will increase your power during workouts, help to stabilise your core and empower you in your everyday life. Incorporating exercises such as lunges, squats and glute bridges into your workout will help to kick your lower body into action and targets all of the muscles in your legs and hips, rather than trying to ineffectively spot-reduce one body part (which we all know never works how we want it to). Tools such as resistance bands and yoga mats will support you in this and make your workouts more effective.  Hip dips are amazing! View this post on Instagram A post shared by N E L L Y L O N D O N (@_nelly_london) Thankfully, there is another way to think about hip dips. There’s a growing movement of hip dip positivity online, rehabilitating the message around this maligned body part and disabusing the notion that there’s any such thing as an ideal body. Your focus should always be on health and balance rather than perfection.  Instagram user @aubreyalyssa summed this attitude up in a post. ‘I've struggled with comparing myself to other women my entire life, and after starting my fitness journey it's no different,’ she said. ‘I will never have the "perfect" body according to society. But I'm learning to love the body I have! Big quads and hip dips! That's not going to change, so might as well embrace it.’ If you’re struggling with loving and accepting your body, Innermost recommends engaging in activities that bring you more in touch with your physicality such as yoga and meditation, and talking through your feelings with friends or a mental health professional.  Read more