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  • Best Foods for Boosting Energy

    12th June 2018

    12th June 2018

    By Shivraj Bassi

    When your energy levels drop, you might by instinct reach for a cup of coffee or something sweet for a quick boost. But the day passes and you realise you're six flat whites in and your hands are beginning to tremble, you might want to consider a healthier alternative to coffee and sugar. To help, we’ve put together a list of some of the best foods for boosting energy when that 4pm slump kicks in.

    Matcha green tea

    As a result of its unique combination of nutrients and amino acids, matcha green tea is known for its energy and endurance benefits, which can last up to 6 hours. And because it contains the amino acid L-Theanine, matcha drinkers tend to avoid the jittery caffeine side effects that coffee drinkers might experience.

    Fresh fruit

    Fresh fruit is the perfect healthy option for fighting fatigue. Its high levels of natural sugar provide a quick pick-me-up whilst fibre content ensures blood sugar levels remain steady throughout the day. Try fruits such as pineapple which contain iodine to control how quickly your body burns energy, or blueberries, which are packed with antioxidants.

    Nuts

    Cashews, almonds and hazelnuts are high in magnesium, which play a key role in converting sugar to energy. Nuts are also filled with fibre, meaning they are able to keep your blood sugar levels even whilst keeping you fuller for longer.

    Dark chocolate

    Dark chocolate contains the natural stimulant theobromine. Theobromine is similar to caffeine in that it boosts your energy and your mood. But don't overdo it - one or two small square of dark chocolate should be enough to get you through those afternoon slumps.

    Brown rice 

    Brown rice is rich in magnesium, which helps produce energy from protein and carbohydrates. Serve as a side dish with your favourite lean protein or add to some veggies for a powerhouse mountain of a lunch or dinner.

    Sweet potato

    High in carbohydrates and loaded with vitamins A and C, sweet potatoes help you fight the midday fatigue while tasting like a sweet treat.

    Spinach

    Spinach is a great source of iron, which is the main component of energy production in the body. Eat a spinach salad for lunch to keep energy levels up, allowing you to function at your best. 

    Eggs

    Containing an amazing complete source of protein (a enormous 97% of it can be absorbed effectively by your body), eggs contain all of the essential amino acids your body needs. Whether you eat them boiled, scrambled, baked or fried, eggs are a go-to source of protein and energy.

    The Energy Booster

    The Energy Booster is our pre/intra-workout booster containing ingredients such as BCAAs, citrulline malate, maca, and beta alanine. These ingredients maximise performance, combat tiredness, enhance energy and keep you going on and on. 

    The Fit Protein

    The Fit Protein is our superfood protein blend containing energy improving ingredients like rhodiola root, magnesium, maca and pink Himalayan sea salt, which when combined together make an amazing energy boosting blend.

    Other Insights

    Everything You Need To Know About England’s Newly Relaxed Genetically Modified Food Laws
    The latest guidance around genetically modified foods and genetically modified food laws are changing. Farming regulations have been eased, and this means that costs of production and rules around the creation of genetically modified foods have been altered to make the production of these foods easier… and this has major implications for the food market. So far, the relaxation of these rules and regulations only relates to England, but it’s rumoured that these changes are not far behind for the rest of the United Kingdom. Genetically modified food laws in the United Kingdom With the recent announcement of the relaxation of genetically modified food laws in England, here at Innermost, we felt it was important to dive into the facts, gain all the information and evaluate what this means for our food produce in the United Kingdom and on our supermarket shelves. These changes have sparked wide-spread debate and discussion around the pros and cons and genetically modified foods, so as a brand that produces our products with non-genetically modified ingredients, our interest in the progression of genetically modified food laws and the pros and cons of genetically modified foods is a key priority. First, let’s get the basics out of the way. What are genetically modified foods, what are the current genetically modified food laws in the UK, and how are they changing? Here we go… What are genetically modified foods? Genetically modified foods are foods that have been defined as those that have had their genetic material (aka, their DNA) altered in a way that natural development would not include. This modification is commonly achieved through the addition of genetic information from another organism (simply, another living thing) and can have drastic consequences for the production and longevity of food products such as fruits and vegetables. What does this mean for food production? Genetically modified foods can lead to greater quantities of production and a reduction in food prices. Not only this, but genetic modification can lead to a greater reliability of high-quality food produce due to the decrease in risk from disease. Winning! The story so far: genetically modified food laws in the United Kingdom The current (pre-relaxed) rules and regulations around genetically modified foods in the United Kingdom are pretty complex, we’re not going to lie. Broken down simply, though, the laws state that any genetically modified foods cannot be farmed without prior approval from regulatory agencies such as The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (or DEFRA, for short). It’s not easy to be approved, either, as since 1992, only 2024 applications have been approved. And after this, any foods that have been approved, that may contain a genetically modified organism (or, as it’s often abbreviated to, a GMO), must be accompanied by written documentation. Not to mention, this process is incredibly expensive, with a £5,000 application fee. As the rules currently stand, thousands of crops have to be thrown away due to their susception to disease such as Blight’s Disease. Whilst genetic modification could easily eradicate this issue and bring thousands more crops to our supermarket shelves, the rules around this method make it so that these foods go unapproved. And therefore, to waste. The proposed genetically modified food law change Whilst a change to these rules looks to be tricky, it’s doable. Scientists are backing the change, with reports stating that a relaxation of these rules would be a welcome change from EU laws, and allow greater, healthier production of crops for our consumption. This change would allow production of GMO foods to be in line with our American counterparts. The pros and cons of genetically modified foods To many, the ideology of genetically modified foods is hailed as fantastic scientific advancement. With the ground-breaking growth in technology that allows us to create a surplus of food to consumers at a low cost, high-yield outcome, many would argue, “why wouldn’t we take advantage of these abilities?” We could go on all day about this debate, but to sum up years of back-and-forth between scientists, farmers, the law and everyday consumers, here’s some of the main arguments towards integrating genetically modified foods into our lives. The pros of genetically modified foods Reduced use of potentially harmful pesticides The creation of drought-resistant foods Accelerated growth speed Better tasting food Less food waste Longer shelf life for food Now, looking at the above list, you’re wondering how anyone can object to the introduction of genetically modified foods. Lower food prices, greater taste, a drop in food waste and a longer shelf life? Sign me up! Well, not everyone feels that way… The cons of genetically modified foods The potential of allergic reactions Genetic modification is a relatively new process The potential for resistance against illness Could lead to the production of harmful toxin Potential loss of nutritional value Summary In light of this proposed relaxation, we thought it was important to mention that all of our products are non-genetically modified, as we prioritise natural, effective ingredients. More information around genetically modified food laws and the current changes are a hot topic at the moment, and something we are keeping a close eye on here at Innermost. We’re big believers in trusting the science. It’s something we’ve always done, are doing, and will continue to do, and keeping you (and ourselves) in the loop when it comes to big changes like this is something we feel super strongly about. Read more
    The Fit, Lean, Strong and Health proteins by Innermost